Author: Ann Patras

I was born and raised a L*O*N*G time ago in Burton on Trent, England where my parents ran the family's busy corner grocery store and later a pub. I moved with my husband and 3 kids to Africa in 1989 where we lived for 32 years. We had many new, strange, exciting, frightening, weird, silly, sad, happy and amazing experiences during that time. After many years of procrastinating and moving to Spain in 2011 I completed the first book in my 'Africa Series' "Into Africa with 3 kids, 13 crates and a husband", in 2014. This only recounted the first year of our family’s somewhat unusual life in Africa. My second book, "More Into Africa with 3 kids, some dogs and a husband" which covers three further years, was released in 2016. I am currently in the mess of writing the third. I love writing about our daft experiences and hopefully making people laugh in the process. Finally, I am absolutely thrilled to to bits to tell you that INTO AFRICA received the Silver Award in the Wishing Shelf Book Awards 2016, (non-fiction category) in the UK.

My Annual Pilgrimage

So April is ITV time.  No I’m not talking about the British television stations, I’m talking vehicles.  Specifically my vehicle, which was due for its annual roadworthy test, which in Spain is called an ITV or Inspección Técnica de Vehículos if you really want to know. So begins the annual pilgrimage.

The procedure is that first you go online (or telephone if your Spanish is good enough, which mine isn’t) and obtain a cita, that’s an appointment.  Then you take your vehicle along to their test station at the appropriate time where it undergoes the rigors of inspection of all the important components like brakes, lights, steering, tyres, wipers and the general condition of said vehicle.  Inside the seatbelts are checked to make sure they all function, together with door handles and windows. Easy peasy!

Anyway as the third month of the year marched on (pun intended) I realised that I had better get my arse into gear, never mind my car, and organise a pre-ITV service of my Renault Kangoo with my very accommodating do-it-at-your-home mechanic, Dave.  Alas, Dave had become quite involved with motor bike repairs within his business and was extremely busy.  It was the end of the month before he could get to me.

A new ITV station had recently opened up in Fuengirola, our nearest coastal town, and I knew exactly where it was, which was closer than the ones I’d been to in the past at San Pedro and last year in Malaga.  So I had waited to ask Dave how ‘accommodating’ he’d found the new place.  Having established they were OK I set-to booking a cita there on the internet before my current ITV expired.  Oh dear.

Searching through my car papers I found it was due by the 8th April and we were already at the 2nd.

The ITV website is quite jacked up.  It simply asks for your vehicle registration number, and for further validation, the date it was first registered, then knows everything about you, right down to your shoe size.  It could clearly see that I needed to be given the first available appointment – which was on Friday 28th April.  OUCH!

I printed off the cita slip and put it in the car with its other papers in the hope that should I get stopped by the police, I could avoid a hefty fine by showing them I was actually getting it done, if a little late.

At least it would give me time to organise the fitment of new seals on my cv joints, which Dave advised me were needed but which he didn’t have time to do himself due to his overload of bike repairs.  He recommended a friend who’s garage just happened to be three doors away from the little bar which we go to when walking the dogs.  The garage owner’s name is Cristobal”, Dave told me.

A lady mechanic? I thought. Novel.

Of course Cristobal turned out to be a very nice Spanish gentleman who even spoke pretty good English and we got on great, especially when I opened the back door of my car and our dogs JD and Marti jumped out (they were to keep me company on the walk home), as Cristobal turned out to be a big a dog lover.

When I had first spoken to him I had asked him where he would recommend me to go to for new tyres and he replied that he could sort that for me too if I told him what I wanted.  I described the amount and type of driving I did on average and said I’d go on his recommendation so long as they weren’t re-treads.  He was quite appalled by that notion so I felt safe in leaving it up to him.  He gave me a rough idea of prices, together with a quote for the CV seals, and the car was all sorted three days later.

But let’s get back to the ITV appointment.   That got worse.  This cita was in Malaga, a place where I always get lost.  When I’d made the appointment I could not find anywhere on their website the option of going to the new place in Fuengirola.

Actually the previous year when I went to this Malaga ITV station for the first time I  found it relatively easily, within a 25 minute drive.  Unfortunately I got hopelessly lost when I came out of the place and it took me almost an hour to get home!

So I made sure I printed off maps from Google to get me there, and bring me back.

And before you ask the obvious, NO, I don’t have satnav.  Whenever I’ve used it on my own I’ve always taken a wrong turn and finished up in someone’s driveway. Anyway that was out of the question now as my (not so smart) phone was out of action after it went for a dip in the swimming pool the day before.  But that’s another story.

Anyway if the Malaga location wasn’t bad enough, what really made it such a shit appointment was that it was for 06:50, in the morning!  What the …? It would mean leaving home at 06:00 to allow time for getting lost. I’d have to get up almost before I’d gone to bed the night before!  (I stay up late.)

We had been having some lovely sunny weather in our area for the past few weeks, but were promised rain for three days, starting on Thursday.  In the event it stayed beautiful on Thursday, until twilight when the dark clouds started rolling in.  Within hours the rain was hurtling down.

I don’t think it stopped all night (what was left of mine) and when my alarm jolted me out of my slumbers it was lashing down outside.

To get off to a good start, I enjoyed my early morning tea out of my “Queen of  ******* Everything” mug my daughter bought for me.  Then I gathered up my paperwork, iPad and my laptop (I figured I would be so early getting to the ITV station I might have time to write a chapter or two of my next book while sitting in the car waiting for them to open) before heading out.  Ziggy kindly handed me our large umbrella and small coolbox containing a couple of beers (0.00% alcohol) and opened the gates for me as I reversed out into the dark and murky morning.

It was 06:05 when I set off up our lane.  I can’t say that I was surprised at the lack of traffic in Alhaurin at that time of day, but I was surprised at how bloody dark it was.  I’d not been up and about so early since the clocks went forward so had been expecting to see a semblance of dawn when I drove off.  Nothing!  Nothing but darkness and a few street lights.  It was only as I was about to filter onto the fast road to Malaga that I decided I should first double check my map for the exit I needed to take off.

Exit 63.  No problem, I could picture it from my last visit.  The only difference was that my last visit had been in broad daylight.  Now I could barely see further than 10 meters in front of my car because of darkness, rain and mist thrown up by other traffic, which by now was slightly more in evidence.

I soon found that trying to overtake slower moving traffic wasn’t such a good idea because of all the spray.  Also, the rain was obscuring the faded white lines on the centre and side of the road so I figured I’d rather stick behind something whose lights I could follow.  I eventually settled myself several car lengths behind a cement truck (didn’t want any cement hurtling out onto my bonnet).

But not only was this bloody weather obscuring white lines, it also had quite an impact on the visibility of road signs.  When I eventually took an exit which I thought must surely be mine, I was horrified to find that it was the one after the one I should have taken.  I had no bloody idea where I was now.

At the earliest opportunity I pulled over to study the map.  Joke.  Even with interior lights and my reading glasses on I couldn’t make out an alternative route in the feint printout.   As I began to create a build-up of traffic behind me I moved off in the general direction I thought I should be in until I could stop at a safer spot.

That didn’t make much difference.  I followed some easy-to-see road signs for a parque industrial (industrial park – see Spanish is easy) because I knew the ITV centre was on one.  Alas there is more than one parque industrial this side of Malaga.  After a couple of dead ends I spotted an illuminated guardhouse of a large establishment and decided to try for help there.

Parking up outside the gate I ran through the deluge to the door of the guardhouse which was thankfully opened for me by a very confused looking, uniformed Spanish gentleman.

“Hola Senor, ayuda por favour!”  which was my best Spanish for “Help, please!”, as I thrust my map in his direction, pointing to the location of the ITV place.

He muttered, ‘Mama mia’ and other words to that effect, which didn’t bode well.

Then after standing with one of those puzzled looks on his face like you see in cartoons (with a ? over the head)  he found a scrap of paper and started to draw a map.  When he’d done he indicated through the guardhouse window which road represented the starting point on his map then gave verbal directions as he guided me through his squiggles.  I thought I understood.

I bade him many graciases and left him to deal with a truck which was waiting patiently to enter his yard.  Then I set off,  hopefully on my final leg.

Well, the this leg also took a few donkey detours until I finished up back at the guardhouse, where I started again from scratch, this time avoiding the wrong turns I’d taken the before.  Eventually I found myself in familiar territory.  Then I spotted the street on which I knew the ITV to be and only took two more wrong turns before I conquered the one-way system which led to it.

YES!  I was here!  And only about 20 minutes late.

I was quite surprised by the car park.  It was packed.  For goodness sakes, it wasn’t yet half past seven in the morning.  I figured most of the cars must belong to employees.

I gathered all my necessary papers, including the road maps with which I hoped to explain to the ITV people that I’d got lost, then grabbed the umbrella.  It’s a big one.  So I opened the door and poked  my brolly in the air before pressing the button to spring it open. Vwoof.  Then I looked down to step out of the car, where there seemed to be rather a lot of water.  Testing it with the toe of my shoe, it must have been over an inch deep and I was only wearing a pair of trainers/takkies/sneakers or whatever you like to call them, with fabric uppers.  I closed the umbrella and brought it dripping across me to the passenger side.  I’d noticed the guy in the car next to me was leaving and thought maybe the puddle might not be so deep on his side.  I moved the Kangoo.

Repeat the performance, umbrella re-opened I swung my legs out and stepped down – into water which went clear over my shoes!  Fan-bloody-tastic!  I quickly locked the car and hopped & skipped forward to try and get out of the water before it penetrated.  Yeah, right!  As I dashed between three rows of cars I soon found that the ‘puddle’ was spread over half the car park.

I lowered my umbrella as I sloshed in through the automatic doorway and walked up to the cita registration machine.  I looked at the registration numbers displayed on this pedestal for mine but it was devoid of anything familiar.  I scrolled forward, nothing.  I tried to scroll backwards to see how far back I’d been listed but it wouldn’t let me.

Then I squelched the length of the waiting room to the counter at the front, occupied by a woman and a man.  I asked the Senora if she spoke English.

“No”.  (No is the same in Spanish you know, but sounds slightly different.)

So I once more tested my linguistic skills by explaining that I had a cita for 6:50 and then waved a finger over my map indicating that I’d got lost.  As her blank face gave off an air of disinterest the Senor to her left said,

“Ann Patras?”

“Yes,” I chirped, giving him my best smile.  He intimated that I should hand him my papers which he looked at, kept two and said I should take a seat and wait.  I asked him how long.  I might as well have asked “how long’s a piece of string?” because he shrugged and said “one minute, five minutes, twenty minutes?” (who knows).

“Would it be better if I went home and made another cita online?” I asked.

“No, just wait there,” he said, indicating a nearby plastic chair.

As I turned to the chair only then did I take in the hoards already seated, waiting.  There must have been over thirty people.  I had been told by Dave that if I wanted to try and get the ITV earlier than the date I’d been given I could take a chance and just pitch up at the centre in Fuengirola, and hope to fit in on a cancellation.

“First thing in the morning, or at lunch time is good,” he said.

I figured this rent-a-crowd must have been a bunch of early morning chancers and hoped I wasn’t going to have to wait behind that lot!  I was just lamenting the fact that I’d stupidly left my iPad the car so didn’t have any comforting distractions when the Senor called my name again.

At the counter he passed back my vehicle registration paper, asked me for €47.36c then handed me more papers and told me to go and wait in my car and watch for my number being displayed on the big exterior screen.

YES!  I was IN!  I couldn’t believe my luck.  What a nice man.  I wanted to kiss him, but thought better of it (anyway he wasn’t that good looking!).

Back outside I cheerfully splashed my way through the ankle-high water before climbing into my car and turning on the windscreen demister and my wipers so I could see the illuminated display on the ITV building’s wall more easily.  I prepared for a wait.

I’d hardly had chance to put a new disc into the cd player when my registration was flashing red before my eyes.  I made my way to Lane 6 in the huge warehouse before they had time to change their minds.

It was a doddle.  The ‘man who does’ was happy to speak his not-so-bad English and we easily went through all the procedures necessary for him to test my systems.  (!!! I’m still talking car here!)    At the end of all the little tests he handed me my up-to-date car sticker which should keep me out of trouble for the next 12 months, pointing out that I needed to replace one of the light bulbs over the rear number plate. I thanked him for his help and off I went.

I only took two, easily rectifiable, wrong turns on the way back to the motorway and was home safe and sound, if still very wet, by 8:35, my pilgrimage complete.

As I recounted my experience to Ziggy he looked very sceptical when I told him how much water I’d sloshed through and how sopping wet my feet were – until I took my socks off and squoze out the equivalent of half a tumbler of water from each one.

He should know better by now than to question me!  Am I not the Queen of  ******* Everything”?

 

ADDENDUM

Over a year has passed since that event so when I went to renew my ITV this year I took no chances.  I got my son to assist me in getting directions to the place using Google Maps satnav on my phone.

I allowed plenty of time and arrived at the ITV Test Station with twenty minutes to spare, the only trouble was it was a different test station.  Still in Malaga it was the ‘old’ station not the ‘new’ one.  The kind man at the desk there gave me instructions on how to get to the other one.  “Turn left here,” he said, pointing to the window.

‘Here’ clearly wasn’t where I started from (after I’d gone round several corners after exiting the station at the rear), so surprise! surprise! I got lost.

Being a Saturday morning there weren’t many places open on the industrial estate to whom I could go to for help.

“Ah” I hear you say “why didn’t you tell your phone to take you to the ‘new’ one?”   I did and it told me it couldn’t find the place either.  See, it’s not just me!

After obtaining the assistance of a man on a bike walking (riding?) a dog,  gave me directions to the new place (in Spanish) which, as I drove around in circles, I clearly hadn’t adequately understood.  Finding myself close to the airport  I then sought help from a taxi driver who was a little more intelligible.

I eventually found it.

By which time it was closed!

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Anyone for Twins?

Talking of the twins…

We were?

Yes.    We being the royal we, as in ‘im indoors’ and me.  I asked him to fetch me a drink of my (non-alcoholic) wine from the fridge as he ‘owed me one’ for the day.

“Oh yeah?” he says.

“Yeah,” I replied, “for not being there when they were born.”

They – Victoria and Leon James – were the subject of our conversation because it was their BIRTHDAY when we were having our little chat.

I am not going to tell you that they turned 39 yesterday because that would be quite rude of me, but on the other hand it will save you the trouble of trying to recall what year it was when they had their 3rd birthday party in Zambia.  It would after all be quite a schlep for you to have to go trolling through Into Africa with 3 kids, 13 crates and a husband to find out.

I’m sure I mentioned in said book that when they arrived they came as a bit of a surprise.  But I didn’t tell you about the palaver that went on in order for them to arrive actually in the hospital.  So if you have five minutes to spare (or ten, depending on how fast you read) and fancy being bored with enlightened on the issue – I promise, no gory details – then read on.

Back in the ‘70s Wednesday was my mum and dad’s night off from their pub.  Occasionally, when Ziggy was working away from home, I would go out with them to one or few of the other local hostelries which they enjoyed.  On this particular evening, the 22nd March 1978, we went to a pub called The Waterloo not far from where I lived.

As we sat chatting in the bar, mostly about what 17-month-old Brad had been misbehaving at that day, I made an observation.

“You know Brad was five weeks early, hey?” I asked.

They nodded.

“Well tomorrow it will be exactly five weeks until I am due to give birth to this baby.” I stated.

“Oh!”  “Is it really?”

“It occurred to me,” I went on, “that with Ziggy working all week in Southend which is several hours drive away, if anything like that should happen this time around, I might need some help getting to the hospital.  Perhaps we should, you know, make a plan.”

“Hmm, yes” said Nancy, my mother.

In the event that this one fights its way out as quickly as Brad did (16 hours start to finish, including the doctor in charge trying to stop him coming*) then we couldn’t hang around waiting for Ziggy to take me to the hospital.  *NO, he didn’t try to push him back inside!  He tried to stop his emergence with drugs – which clearly didn’t work.

A discussion duly took place between Nancy, Mev (my dad) and myself with ‘the plan’ being made.

We enjoyed the rest of our evening and I was duly dropped off at home.  Relieving the babysitter – our next door neighbour – I briefly explained our plan to her, as she would likely have to be party to the exercise.  She agreed to help whenever needed.

Fortunately Brad was not an early riser but the next morning I was awoken suddenly at 7 o’clock, with a very familiar damp feeling under my backside. Yep, my waters had broken.

My first call was to Ziggy, or his digs to be precise as this was light years before cell phones existed.  He came to the phone, saying he was in the middle of eating a hearty breakfast.  I told him the good news.

“You’re kidding me.  It’s not due for weeks yet.”

“Neither was Brad.  And it is exactly five weeks early, to the day.  Just like Brad!”

“Oh Shit!”, which was the sort of response I had expected.

“Okay, so now what?” He asked.

“Don’t you worry about it.  We actually made a plan last night and everything is under control.  Nancy will take me to the hospital and you just get there as soon as you can.  It would be nice if you could be there for the birth this time.”

I had to have that one dig, as he’d missed being at Brad’s arrival because he had been in the hospital car park eating fish and chips whilst I was giving birth!

As this conversation was taking place only minutes after my damp discovery I told him to finish his breakfast first, which he did.  He then packed his bag, paid his accommodation bill then nipped along to the site he was working on to explain that he wouldn’t be working that day.  This was the Thursday before Easter so he was due to drive home that night anyway, for the long weekend.

Next I phoned my mum.  I got the same response, more or less.

“Are you being serious?” she asked, “not doing a dummy-run ‘just in case’?”

I assured her I was deadly serious but that she shouldn’t panic.

“I was in the middle of preparing the sandwiches for the pub, have I got time to finish them?  Have you actually gone into labour yet?”

“No, it’s okay, only a few twinges to let me know this is the real thing and that I didn’t just pee myself in the bed.” I assured her. “You have plenty of time to finish making your sandwiches.”

By this time Brad was awake and demanding my attention so we went down to the kitchen for breakfast.  Then I finished packing the small case I’d put aside for taking to the hospital.  I had made sure this was ready well in advance.

I didn’t want a repeat of the performance I’d had with Brad.  On that day, a Saturday, once we realised what was happening and that Brad was arriving much sooner than we’d expected, it dawned on me that I had nothing prepared.  I mean, I didn’t even own a night-dress.  So Ziggy dropped me at my folks’ pub while he went shopping in town to buy me a couple of nighties, as well as some other bits and pieces.  By the time he returned to the pub to take me through to the hospital, the customers were getting very nervous about my presence, as I was starting to get contractions.  But that’s another story.

Next I went to Betty next door and asked her if she could look after Brad for us while my mum drove me to the hospital.  No problem, just call me when you’re ready to leave, she’d said.   I made sure Brad was organised with toys to keep him occupied and I was folding the terry-towelling nappies which had just finished drying in the tumble dryer when my mum arrived.

“What on earth are you doing?  You shouldn’t be working now.”  She was such a fusspot.  “Are you getting any contractions yet?”

“Yes.”

“How often?”

“Oh about every twenty minutes or so,” I answered calmly.

“WHAT?  Let’s go!”

Brad was more than happy to stay with Betty, who had four kids of her own albeit older, and my mum promised to come back to look after Brad as soon as she’d seen me comfortably (??) settled at the hospital.

I think now is the time I should just explain a little about my home town.  Burton upon Trent sits, as you might imagine, on the River Trent.  The main body of the town lies on west side of the river and there are a couple of fairly substantial suburbs on the eastern side.  We lived in one of those.  My parents’ pub sat in Burton ‘proper’ on the other side of the river near the Town Hall and the railway station.   The hospital was also on the west side of the river, but further away from us than my folks’ pub.

So within fifteen minutes of her arrival, Nancy and I were on our way to the Andressey Hospital, as it was called then.  As she drove she mentioned that the traffic was ‘getting a bit hectic’ at the bridge when she came over it.

In 1978 there was only one bridge over the River Trent at Burton, so as you might imagine it could get quite busy.  This was especially so if travelling in a westerly direction, because there were four busy roads all converging onto this one bridge.  It was even more hectic on the days when the very popular outdoor market was held twice a week, which was on Saturdays and Thursdays.

Now if you remember, I mentioned earlier that this was the Thursday before Easter, so as well as the lure of the market, every man, woman and child, with their dog, was making their way into Burton as all the shops would be closed on Good Friday, and they had to stock up for the long weekend.

We drove down the steep Bearwood Hill Road, which filtered into Newton Road before reaching the traffic lights controlling this wonderful junction.

Alas we came to a standstill partway down the hill behind about eight cars which were interlaced with two double-decker buses.  That in itself was a bad sign as buses in and out of our suburb normally only came one at a time.  And all those vehicles in front of us had to fight with the traffic on Newton Road before they could even reach the traffic lights.

We slowly made progress with each change of the lights and had only three cars waiting in front of us when my mum asked me,

“Are you alright, our Ann?  You seem to be doing some huffing and puffing.  How often are you getting the contractions?”

“About every ten minutes,”  I grimaced.

I thought my mother was going to have a seizure herself.  She started ranting that she was going to call for a police escort, though quite how she would do this was beyond me.  Never a policeman in sight when you need one!

“Then I’m going to toot my hooter,”  she said.  I managed to stop her just in time.

“No-one will know why you’re doing that mum.  And if they did, they can hardly move out of the way, where would they move to, it’s choc-a-bloc on that bridge?”  She conceded my point.

But I had to stop talking to put a bit more effort into the breathing exercises I’d been taught in antenatal classes a couple of years ago.  It was supposed to relieve the pain.  Bullshit!

As I sat and breathed with varying degrees of severity my mum eventually got us across the Trent Bridge, then she let it rip.  It was as if she were daring a police car to pull her over for speeding so she could get an escort, a move I was now becoming in favour of.  But at the pace we were going, I was more concerned that we might finish up in A&E instead of the maternity unit!

She abandoned the car near the front of the Andressey building then walked with me until we met a nurse, to whom we explained that things were pretty imminent.  As she lead me through to the check-in desk Nancy went and put the car in the designated car park before it got towed away.  Nancy joined me as the woman behind the desk was finishing taking my details.  I had told her that I was five weeks early but she didn’t seem bothered about that and said,

“Right, if you’d just like to get your towel and toiletries and take a bath…”.

“Oh, there won’t be time for a bath!” Nancy and I piped up in unison.

Not unless I’m down for a water-birth, I muttered under my breath.

With a look which said she hadn’t believed a word of anything I’d said, the battle-axe handed me over to a nurse who had arrived nearby.

“Right, let’s find you a bed,” she said.

I knew the general procedure from my previous visit.  There was a long ward full of beds containing females in various stages of agony.  The rule of thumb was that the sooner you were likely to pop, the closer your bed was to the exit, which lead to the delivery rooms.  This staff nurse obviously had more sympathy for my plight than the dragon woman, as she put me in a bed second from the door.  My status was also supported by the fact that I was having my third contraction in the space of ten minutes.

Once attired in the stunning hospital gown and settled in the bed, I was having a really bad spasm when Nancy suddenly said,

“Oh, I’m so sorry Ann, but I just can’t stay here and watch you in such agony.  I’m going to have to go to Brad,” and with that she was gone.

The staff nurse conducted a physical examination and was surprised when I told her I was five weeks early.

“You can’t be,” she said, “you’re too big.”

I assured her I knew exactly when the baby was conceived and that I was five weeks early.

With eyes rather wide she continued, “Well if you are, you’re having a very big baby!”

Now, that I did NOT want to hear.  When Brad was born he weighed in at a miniscule 4lb 14oz (2.2Kg) so compared to most women, I’d had a relatively easy time of giving birth.  But it certainly hadn’t been without pain, so I dreaded to think what it would be like expelling a ‘very big baby’.

But I didn’t have much time to dwell on that because ten minutes later I went into second stage labour.  That surprised them a bit.

It surprised me too!  Despite having gone through it all before, I had forgotten exactly how strong the involuntary urge to ‘push’ the foreign body out became at this point.  And one must not do that, until told to so by the attending doctor, or in my case, midwife.  So they teach you (at antenatal classes) how to breath properly to contain that urge.

For those of you who haven’t done it – men mostly, I reckon – you might have noticed that there is more to this child-bearing business than meets the eye.

After some to-ings and fro-ings the staff nurse, aided by another nurse, eventually wheeled my bed out of the ward, down the corridor and into a delivery room.

As they got me where they wanted me and readied all their gear, I panted and groaned my way through another agonising contraction.  The next minute the midwife smiled at me and said,

“Okay Ann, you can push whenever you’re ready.”

Nothing happened.  I had no more urge to push a baby out from between my trembling legs than jump naked off a fifty storey building.  So we all just waited.

Then suddenly it came again.  Fed up with having to hold it back previously, I pushed with all my might.  I’m not sure how many pushes I made, I wasn’t too fussed about counting at the time, but eventually at 12:45pm out it came.

“Well, you’ve got a little girl… she counted all the fingers and toes … and she’s just fine,” said the staff nurse.

They wrapped Victoria in a foil blanket and after briefly showing her to me, put her straight into an incubator for premature babies.

“But we thought you’d have a bigger baby than this!” and promptly stuck her hand into the cavern very recently vacated by my new daughter and said, “Oh, there’s another one in there!!”

Well that threw the buggers into a bit of a tizz, I can tell you.  They’d only catered for one.

“Just wait while we go and get another incubator, Ann.”

“Don’t worry, I’m going nowhere!” I replied.

So they faffed around, sorting out all the extra bits and pieces they needed, while I gazed and whistled at the ceiling.  They really should put some nice pictures up there for people lying here, I thought.

Leon James was born exactly five minutes after Victoria.  One push and he was out.  He could have been born much sooner if they’d been properly prepared!

He too was immediately cocooned in tin foil and shown to me before being placed in his own box.

The twins then had to be rushed by Ambulance to the Special Care Baby Unit which was housed on the other side of town in Burton’s General Hospital.  As they were wheeled away the midwife looked at me.

“You don’t seem too surprised by finding you’ve had twins, Ann,” she said

“That’s because I’m not.  I told my doctor over a month ago that I thought I was having twins, because I could feel them moving in different places.  But he wouldn’t believe me!”

Way back then, unless there were signs of problems, the average mother-to-be only got to see the gynaecologist four weeks before she was due to give birth.  I hadn’t made it that far so hadn’t had a scan.

“I can’t wait to see the doc’s face when I tell him!” I said.

His wasn’t the only face I couldn’t wait to see.  Ziggy was going to be in for a bit of a surprise too.  Shit, everybody was!

Alas, still needing the recovery facilities afforded by the maternity unit, I had to remain at the Andressey.  I was neatly draped and sitting up in bed when Ziggy arrived just after one o’clock.  He stood by the bed.

“So how are you doing?  How long do they think it’ll be before you have it?”  [One does not deflate back to normal size immediately after childbirth.  I still looked very pregnant.]

“What do you mean, how long?  It’s already happened.  You missed it.  Again.”

“No!  I came as fast as I could.  Broke every speed limit on the way here.”

“Yes, I’m sure you did.  But it all happened pretty damn quick.”

“So what have we got?  TELL ME!”

“At 12:45 Victoria was born,” I told him with a big smile.

He was so happy, laughing and dancing about like a maniac beside my bed.

“And at 12:50 Leon James was born!” I continued.

“What?  What did you say?  Did you say we have a boy as well?  Twins?  TWINS????”

His face was an absolute picture.

After he got over the shock we sat and chatted about what had gone on.  Then he was anxious to leave.  He said he couldn’t wait to tell my mum.  Before he left he established that he would be able to see the twins in the Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU).

He planned to go home, give my mum the good news then follow her to the pub so that he could leave Brad with them there for half an hour while he went to the SCBU.  Of course he would come back and see me later.

As he left the ward his grin was so wide it almost reached into his ears.

What a day that was!  Thank you my babies. XX

Jeepers Creepers

SOUTH AFRICA, Sunday 14th Feb 2010

You’ve heard of something being as interesting as watching grass grow?

One Thursday evening Leon came round for supper.  While we were waiting for the roast, we decided to have a game of cards.

Waiting for him out on the patio, whilst he was buggering about with something inside, I was sitting looking at nothing in particular, when I thought I saw a slight movement – of a plant.

Now you might ask, “What’s so unusual in that?  They are not exactly solid as concrete or contained in a hermetically sealed, breeze-free tank, but grow wild and rampant in your garden.”

Ah, Yes.  BUT it was a totally windless evening.  Not the slightest hint of even a breath of wind was to be felt.

Then, you might remark “There must have been an insect or even a very small lizard crawling up it’s nether regions.”  But “No”, I would reply, “I checked all over and around it”.  There were no foreign bodies to be found lurking anywhere upon it.

It was moving entirely by itself.

SH!T, I thought, the Triffids have landed.

Actually it was the tendril of a Morning Glory plant which has chosen to infiltrate the bougainvillea bush just outside my patio.  This particular tendril had grown its way around the white, plastered pillar which supports my patio roof, so it was all on its little ownsome, and thus clearly definable.

About 30cm (or about a foot to the unmetricised) of tendril leant against the pillar.  Until it started to move – away from the pillar towards where I was seated on the patio.

I rubbed my eyes and looked again, but as I stared at it, sure as eggs is eggs and the Pope’s a Catholic, I could physically see it growing.

I thought “Sod me”, or words to that effect, and after checking it out for a few more minutes, called Leon to come and witness this amazing phenomenon, cos even surer than eggs is eggs and the Pope’s a German (at the time of the incident) Catholic, no-one would believe me if I told them about this, without having a witness.

I said to him,

“Leon, just stand perfectly still and watch that plant, and tell me if you can see anything unusual about it.”  After less than a minutes, he said “Bloody Hell, it’s MOVING”.

We continued to watch until after about seven or eight minutes the end of the tendril had moved a couple of inches away from the pillar.

I went and called Ziggy to see it too, but in his own particular idiom he told me to go away.

Leon and I were transfixed by this marvel and only when it was too dark, did we realise that we should have been videoing this close encounter with nature.  But I did manage to take a couple of photos showing its progress.

When I first saw it, the tendril was flat up against, and halfway across, the pillar, as in photo 1.  It then started to move towards me until it was eventually about six inches away from the wall (photos 2 & 3).

In the final picture it had turned and was making its way back to where it had originally come from.

creeper-1

Creeper 1

creeper-2

Creeper 2

creeper-3

Creeper 3

creeper-4

Creeper 4

By this time we had realised that it wasn’t so much ‘growing’ as moving round.  Spookyyyy.

But to watch it in action was like seeing one of those documentary programs where they speed up the film.   Albeit this was somewhat slower, but it was LIVE.

Watching grass grow definitely has nothing on watching a creeper creep!

PHOTOGRAPHS – MORE INTO AFRICA with 3 Kids, some Dogs and a Husband

Here are a few more photographs taken during the three years covered by More Into Africa.  Sorry the quality isn’t too good on some of them, time has taken its toll.

Brad, ready for his first day at Big School, Lechwe Primary 6 Sept 1981.

Brad, ready for his first day at Big School, Lechwe Primary 6 Sept 1981.

The trio, on Brad's first day at Lechwe Primary. Would you look at the size of those school cases Vicki and Leon have!

The trio, on Brad’s first day at Lechwe Primary. Would you look at the size of those school cases Vicki and Leon have!

Brad on the slipway at Kafue River. Until I found this photo I hadn't realised he'd got so close to the water's edge! SCAREY!

Brad on the slipway at Kafue River. Until I found this photo I hadn’t realised he’d got so close to the water’s edge! SCAREY!

Leon, also o the Kafue River slipway.

Leon, also o the Kafue River slipway.

Doris with Vicki, Leon and Brad at the Theatre Club, December 1981.

Doris with Vicki, Leon and Brad at the Theatre Club, December 1981.

Our "Queen Mother", though I can't imagine the real one would have struck a pose like that! (Looks like she's doing the 'I'm a Little Teapot' nursery rhyme!)

Our “Queen Mother”, though I can’t imagine the real one would have struck a pose like that! (Looks like she’s doing the ‘I’m a Little Teapot’ nursery rhyme!)

Sitting on the wall that Vicki nearly tumbled onto.

Sitting on the wall that Vicki nearly tumbled onto.

The Boss. Pensive, tired or nursing a hang-over?

The Boss. Pensive, tired or nursing a hang-over?

Mother and Daughter, November 1982.

Mother and Daughter, November 1982.

A trip around the garden in the company bakkie.

A trip around the garden in the company bakkie.

Kitwe Little Theatre swimming pool. The shallow end is on the left.

Kitwe Little Theatre swimming pool. The shallow end is on the left.

Sister Ann in Hamlet, 1983

Sister Ann in Hamlet, 1983

Part of the cast of the Olde Time Music Hall, October 1983. Just look at that brazen bint in the centre!!

Part of the cast of the Olde Time Music Hall, October 1983. Just look at that brazen bint in the centre!!

Lizzie Land Rover when we first bought her in July 1983.  Sorry for the poor colour quality here.  She REALLY was pale yellow.

Lizzie Land Rover when we first bought her in July 1983. Sorry for the poor colour quality here. She REALLY was pale yellow.

Bass at 8 weeks old. Yes, I did say EIGHT weeks!! And Vicki with Sally.

Bass at 8 weeks old. Yes, I did say EIGHT weeks!! And Vicki with Sally.

Vicki ad baby Bass. March 1983.

Vicki ad baby Bass. March 1983.

Coke being pestered by Bass.

Coke being pestered by Bass.

Had enough of puppies!

Had enough of puppies!

Bass a little older, but still with razor sharp teeth, as can be seen from Vicki's pained expression when she got nipped!

Bass a little older, but still with razor sharp teeth, as can be seen from Vicki’s pained expression when she got nipped!

All the dogs - July 1983.

All the dogs – July 1983.

Mwande Crescent with it's long awaited swimming pool.

Mwande Crescent with it’s long awaited swimming pool.

Leon and Vicki with Clarence.

Leon and Vicki with Clarence.

Brad being 'dressed up' for his role as a shepherd in the '83 Christmas concert. I think his beard came unstuck!

Brad being ‘dressed up’ for his role as a shepherd in the ’83 Christmas concert. I think his beard came unstuck!

All three ready for Lechwe.

All three ready for Lechwe.

Private Brad, US Army. Christmas 1983.

Private Brad, US Army. Christmas 1983.

Vicki, Christmas 1983

Vicki, Christmas 1983

Super Spaceman, Christmas 1983

Super Spaceman, Christmas 1983

Christmas dress-ups. 1983.

Christmas dress-ups. 1983.

L - R. Karen & Christopher Heath, Jenny Coote, Miari & Ken Cummins. Standing at the bar John McConkey with his dad Mac seated at the bar on the left.

L – R. Karen & Christopher Heath, Jenny Coote, Miari & Ken Cummins. Standing at the bar John McConkey with his dad Mac seated at the bar on the left.

Vicki with Sarah Coote.

Vicki with Sarah Coote.

Brad, Richard Coote and Alistair Cummins.

Brad, Richard Coote and Alistair Cummins.

The Big Catch! Vicki, Sarah, Brad, Alistair and Leon. And, of course, FISH.

The Big Catch! Vicki, Sarah, Brad, Alistair and Leon. And, of course, FISH.

Brothers.

Brothers.

Coca Cola concentrate bottle used for the Milk Run. It held 5 litres.

Coca Cola concentrate bottle used for the Milk Run. It held 5 litres.

Vicki and Leon's sixth birthday cakes, to share with classmates at Lechwe Primary.

Vicki and Leon’s sixth birthday cakes, to share with classmates at Lechwe Primary.

The 'practice put-up' of our new continental tent.

The ‘practice put-up’ of our new continental tent.

Mulungushi Dam camp-site.

Mulungushi Dam camp-site.

The camp kitchen, Mulungushi. Ken, Ziggy and Miari.

The camp kitchen, Mulungushi. Ken, Ziggy and Miari.

Ken in relaxed mode.

Ken in relaxed mode.

Brad on the dam's edge.

Brad on the dam’s edge.

Me, attempting fishing Can't remember if I caught anything.

Me, attempting fishing Can’t remember if I caught anything.

Vicki and Leon, Sports Day at Lechwe. 1984.

Vicki and Leon, Sports Day at Lechwe. 1984.

Lechwe Primary first official School Photo, June 1984.

Lechwe Primary first official School Photo, June 1984.

With Nancy and Mev at Itezhi-tezhi hot springs at Kafue National Park. Some wit had rammed a pipe into the ground to cause a water-spout.

With Nancy and Mev at Itezhi-tezhi hot springs at Kafue National Park. Some wit had rammed a pipe into the ground to cause a water-spout.

David Shepherd Lodge, Kafue National Park.

David Shepherd Lodge, Kafue National Park.

David Shepherd Lodge, Kafue National Park.

David Shepherd Lodge, Kafue National Park.

Interested parties at Leon's Prize Giving. Richard Coote's legs, Brad, Leon's teacher who's name escapes me, Sarah, Vicki, Leon, Me, Karen with Christopher, Lynne Quarmby, her neice Charlotte, in green I don't know, Lynn's step-daughter Hilary with Lynn's daughter Laura, Jane Hales and my Dad and Mum.

Interested parties at Leon’s Prize Giving. Richard Coote’s legs, Brad, Leon’s teacher who’s name escapes me, Sarah, Vicki, Leon, Me, Karen with Christopher, Lynne Quarmby, her neice Charlotte, in green I don’t know, Lynn’s step-daughter Hilary with Lynn’s daughter Laura, Jane Hales and my Dad and Mum.

Proud family

Proud Mum and Dad

More proud family.

Proud Grandparents.

 

I’m in the Spotlight on Sunday

Hi Folks,

Do you remember me telling you about a fantastic FB Group I belong to called We Love Memoirs? It was put together by two British authors living here in Spain in order to introduce people who enjoy reading memoirs to authors who write them. It is truly the friendliest group on FB.

Well, next Sunday, 12 June,  I am going to be in the hot seat on a weekly slot they call Spotlight Sunday, where any WLM members can ask me questions about ANYTHING. I must confess that I have done it before and it was great fun, but with the release of More Into Africa they want to put me on the stand again for the benefit of members who have joined more recently.

If you’d like to participate in this crazy question/answer session or even just read what others have asked, and see my answers, all you need to do is join WLM.

You can visit the page yourself and apply, or post post a message on my Facebook and I’ll put your name forward.  Here are the links either way.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/welovememoirs/?__mref=message

 

https://www.facebook.com/ann.patrasauthor?ref=ts&fref=ts

PHOTOGRAPHS – INTO AFRICA with 3 kids,13 crates and a husband

View of the front of the Little House, which was home for our first two months in Kitwe.

View of the front of the Little House, which was home for our first two months in Kitwe.

Vicki, Leon & Nina

Vicki, Leon & Nina

Under protection?

Under protection?

Brad's grooming session with Nina.

Brad’s grooming session with Nina.

Here you can see just how thin Nina was when we first arrived at the Little House.  It's a miracle she survived the tick fever.  She was a wonderful dog.

Here you can see just how thin Nina was when we first arrived at the Little House. It’s a miracle she survived the tick fever. She was a wonderful dog.

Budding Golfers

Budding Golfers

Brad's 4th Birthday Party

Brad’s 4th Birthday Party

Birthday Bike

Birthday Bike

The Big House, 1

The Big House, 1

The Big House, 2

The Big House, 2

Watermelon Man Nov 1980

Watermelon Man Nov 1980

Brad with puppy Coke

Brad with puppy Coke

Leon, Brad and Vicki with Nanny (my mum Nancy).

Leon, Brad and Vicki with Nanny (my mum Nancy). Leon was holding a frog in his left hand, poor thing. 

3rd BD MM Hats 81

The Mr Men party hats Nancy and I spent hours making.

Vicki & Leon 3rd Birthday.1

Vicki & Leon 3rd Birthday.1

3rd Birthday twins

3rd Birthday twins

Three kids in a wheel-barrow, and don't forget the dog!

Three kids in a wheel-barrow, and don’t forget the dog!

Transport in Motion

Transport in Motion

A blue headed lizard

A blue headed lizard

Beside the climbing tree

Beside the climbing tree

Beside the climbing tree

Beside the climbing tree

Braaimaster Ziggy

Braaimaster Ziggy

One of my favourite oldies with the kids.

One of my favourite oldies with the kids.

When we returned to England at the end of our first year.  With my mum and dad (Nancy & Mev), and I'm holding my Goddaughter, Kelly.

When we returned to England at the end of our first year. With my mum and dad (Nancy & Mev), and I’m holding my Goddaughter, Kelly.

I’m sorry there aren’t more pics, but the quality of the film  has proved that many of our photographs just haven’t stood the test of time as well as they might.

I’ve done it again.

If you look in the drop-down menu of Crazy Ramblings you will see that I described, at quite some length, the degree of my General Stupidity when it came to setting up this blog.

I eventually managed to sort myself out, though dog knows how.  Unfortunately I must have blogged myself out with that because I then didn’t touch it for months, as you will no doubt have realised.

Then, with the rapidly approaching release of my second book, I thought it was time I put a few finishing touches to the trivia about my first book.  You may have noticed that I posted copies of the sketches which appeared in the paperback version of Into Africa.  This was chiefly for the benefit of those who bought the Kindle version of the book, as that edition only contained a few.  It took almost as much effort for me to draw those few miserable sketches  as it did to write the entire book, so I didn’t see why anyone should be denied the pleasure of my exquisite masterpieces.

However, when I posted them in their rightful place, I also made a rather rash promise that I would also add some photographs of the family during that era too.

Last night I decided it was time I honoured that promise, and set to with gusto.

Well, I had gusto to start with, but I’m afraid it rather blew itself out as the daylight hours faded and I still battled on, trying to tart-up faded and jaded photographs using the modern technology offered by Photoshop.  When I came to transfer them to the storage facility which sits in the annals of this blog, I couldn’t find where I had saved the nice, bright, shiny versions on my computer.  But I battled on.

I finally tracked them down and carefully transferred them here, all in chronological order so as not to confuse you, my dear readers, only to find as I checked through the batch, that I had missed one out.  It was one I particularly liked, of my mum with the kids, so I searched it out and added it in.  But it wasn’t in quite the right order.

Despite vigorously searching the help notes on WordPress I could find no way to edit this gallery of fine art.  So I said to myself,

“Ann,” I said “it is now half past one in the morning and you are perhaps no longer at your sharpest, so why don’t you call it a day?”

I went on,

“Have yourself a good night’s sleep then when you’re bright and fresh in the morning (ha, ha, ha) you can look at it with fresh eyes and a clear head.”

Personally I think that was expecting a bit much from me, but I heeded my advice and shut up shop.

So now you’re expecting me to tell you how easy it was for me to sort it all out perfectly and guide you to the right spot to view those Patrases of the past, aren’t you?  TOUGH!   Because I have just spent three quarters of an hour trying to find the bloody Gallery where these photos were saved as a draft and ….  gone!  Zippo.  Zilch.  Zero.  Nil.  Nada. Nix. Naught.  Bugger All !!!  Can I find a Gallery?  Can I thump!

So I shall gently close this laptop, as opposed to throwing it into the pool, and quietly leave the subject until I am of a more relaxed and placid state of mind.    Hrrrmmmm.

Hasta luego.

PS.  In case you haven’t seen them yet, you’ll find the sketches carefully hidden in the Africa Series drop-down menu.